Nov 5, 2018

Product Warranties in the Amazon Age

Product Warranties: Amazon boxes ready to ship

New products typically come with warranties. Those warranties also can include other provisions that affect the consumer’s legal rights such as disclaimers of warranties and arbitration clauses. These days, products often aren’t purchased at a store. Consumers purchase them with the click of a mouse, and they are delivered to the front door. How do the terms of a product warranty come into existence when the buyer never touches the product until they arrive after the purchase? The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals addressed this question in Dye v. Tamko Bldg. Products, Inc., Case No. 17-14052 (decided November 2, 2018)…. Read more


Sep 5, 2017

Beware of Post-Closing Actions Having a Retro-Active Pre-Closing Impact

Balance Sheet

We are now in September, and with the turn of the Gregorian calendar, comes the unofficial end of summer for both the United States and Israel.  Most have taken their summer holidays, the children are back in school, and the company transaction environment gains new momentum for the balance of the calendar year.  It is a good time to reflect. When selling the equity of a company, Sellers expect Buyers to require a representation and warranty that (1) all taxes of the company have been paid or reserved on the target’s balance sheet and (2) all tax returns previously filed… Read more


Jan 7, 2015

The Spearin Doctrine: Determining Who Bears the Construction Risk of Design Errors

All owners, contractors, and subcontractors should carefully negotiate contract clauses that govern their relationships. In addition, all construction participants should be aware of the many implied obligations in construction contracts. An implied obligation is one that is not expressly stated in a contract but implied, by courts, arbitration panels, and dispute review boards. One such implied obligation is the implied warranty of the adequacy of the plans and specifications, also known as the Spearin Doctrine. Before the turn of the 19th century, the law generally placed all construction risk on contractors, except in the event that their contract expressly stated… Read more